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Digital Humanities: Examples

Support for researchers using the Library's collections with Digital Humanities techniques.

Off Beat: Jeff Nuttall and the International Underground

This small collection of Jeff Nuttall’s personal papers, labelled by him ‘the ’60s box’, contains unique manuscripts of literary and artistic value relating to various ’zines, such as My Own Mag, which Nuttall produced and edited.

There is also a very significant sequence of in-letters from over one hundred poets, writers, artists and activists who contributed to various Nuttall projects.

SPECTRAL IMAGING @CHICC

CHICC have begun our testing our new MegaVision spectral lighting panels.

By photographing objects under this lighting system, we are able to see what is essentially hidden, either text under text, water marks, text on pasted down pages and text obscured by damage.

Using facial recognition techniques to compare portraits associated with Shakespeare

A recent experiment was carried by Ray Evans, Research Fellow in Psychology at the University of Manchester, who used forensic image recognition software to compare the face in the Grafton portrait with the engraving of Shakespeare by Martin Droëshout.

The Mary Hamilton Papers at the John Rylands Library

This project presents letters and other material from the Mary Hamilton Papers (archive GB 133 HAM) in the University of Manchester Library’s Special Collections, containing 2474 pieces of correspondence, 16 diaries and 6 manuscript volumes, and housed at the John Rylands Library on Deansgate.

Digital Humanities Library Lab

In 2016-2017, we hosted two pilot workshops for researchers to explore some of the Library's digital collections and inspire Digital Humanities research projects. These covered resources such as Jisc Historical Texts, JSTOR Topicgraph and Text Analyzer, Broadside Ballads Online, Robots Reading Vogue, Illustrated London News and Adam Matthew Mass Observation Online.

Examples at other institutions

Some key examples of Digital Humanities projects using library collections around the world.

JSTOR Labs

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